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Evangelist Franklin Graham recently sent a string of tweets encouraging his followers to engaged politically, but made some pretty troubling statements about individuals who identify as “progressive.”

While discussing how Wisconsin had “lost a seat in its state Supreme Court to a progressive judge,” he said that the reason why was that many Christians didn’t come out and vote. He then told followers that not only was the word “progressive” “just a code word” for “for someone who leans toward socialism,” he also added that it’s code for someone “who does not believe in God, & who will likely vote against Godly principles that are so important to our nation.”

Encouraging Christians (or really, any informed citizen) to vote for candidates that represent their values is a pretty non-controversial statement. But, suggesting that people who maintain a different political philosophy all don’t believe in God isn’t just a poor way to engage in political discourse, it’s downright wrong.

While it’s true, according to Pew, that more Republicans report believing in God than Democrats, a majority—55%—of Democrats still say they believe in God with absolute certainty, and an additional 21% say that they are fairly certain God exists. In fact, despite Graham’s tweet just 13% of Democrats say they don’t believe in God.

It’s fine for Christians to have strong political opinions and for them to advocate for them, but slandering the other side only drives a deeper wedge between people who disagree, instead of building bridges to find areas of common ground.