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Early this summer, citizens of the United Kingdom voted to leave the EU. The immediate political and economic effects were dramatic, with then-Prime Minister David Cameron stepping down and world markets dipping violently.

But moving forward, the “Brexit” may signal a more long-term effect on how developed countries view immigration.

According to Vox, in the two decades before Brexit, immigration and race relations weren’t a central issue. But today, 45 percent of Britons say it’s “very important.” Actually, nearly 80 percent think immigration levels should be cut back. The attitudes that fueled the Brexit vote could have dangerous consequences for refugee communities.

Nearly 5 million Syrians are currently refugees, and more than 6 million are displaced in their own country. And, with no end to the conflict in sight, those numbers could increase.