Around the world, migrants are facing deportations and general closed doors when they reach what they hope to be their new homes.

According to a report by The New York Times, Germany has just ordered its third mass deportation of people back to Afghanistan since the fall. This was just hours after the cabinet voted for tapping cellphones and putting electronic tracking bracelets on migrants who they felt could propose a threat.

Like the United States, Europe’s newest counter-terrorism measures have made it clear that migrants are less welcome than they previously were.

According to the Times, Sweden, Britain, Italy and Hungary are just four countries that have doubled down on measures to keep migrants out.

For Germany, the push for deportations and strengthened borders comes from the December terrorist attack when a Tunisian man seeking asylum drove a truck through a Berlin Christmas market and killed 12 people. He had been removed from Italy and was listed as a terrorist threat to be deported, but never was.

In spite of that, human rights organizations argue that European governments are being too restrictive on people who are just searching for a better life, or worse, fleeing war and other danger.