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Times have certainly changed over the last few years, because now over half of Americans would rather forgo a promotion and that office with a view to have more time for something that they care about, like family. Particularly millennials are more concerned about maintaining a work-life balance than generations prior, and they no longer believe in climbing the corporate ladder as a definition to their success.

Finding a good balance between your social and work life can be demanding and inconvenient. Sometimes there just aren’t enough hour in the day, no matter how hard we try. But how much of your personal life are you willing to give up for the sake of your salary? Turns out, according to CreditLoan, you might not have to give up as much as you think for an increased income.

In a survey of U.S. employees, CreditLoan found that those who prioritized their family and children over their careers earned an average $8,714 more per year than their counterparts. While the familial prioritization correlated with a higher salary, it may have also had something to do with people who had higher salaries feeling more comfortable prioritizing family.

But regardless, Corrie Colliton, CreditLoan’s creative director, found that these findings indicate it’s possible to balance work and life without damaging your career in the long run.

Life without balance leads to burnout,” Colliton told CNBC Make It. “If you’re living for your career alone, you miss out on fulfilling relationships and hobbies, and your health can even fall by the waysideBy prioritizing your health and the people who love and support you, you may be more likely to flourish in every area of life. You may feel more refreshed, confident and present when you’re actually at work.”